Buddhist Chants

Chanting “The Three Refuges” as a daily practice helps us recall the good qualities of the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha.

It inspires and motivates us to tread in the footsteps of our teacher, Buddha.

Buddhist chants were created by the monks to remember the suttas (teaching) delivered by The Buddha. Buddhist chants which is also known as Buddhist prayers are all in Pali language. Pali language was being during Buddha’s time. Since it is not a common language for modern days, it is tough for us to understand Buddhist Chant. Not to worry, as most of the chants were translated into English language.

There are thousands and thousands of Buddhist chants. How Buddhists and monks remember a chant is by repeating many times. Since chants are in Pali language, devotees and monks must understand the meaning of each verse to understand Buddha’s teaching delivered 2500 years ago. Most of the monks from Theravada tradition learn Pali language.

If you find chanting is hard to remember or hard to understand, we have a simple solution for you.

D-kidz designed a Buddhist Chants album, D-kidz Chant. This album primarily focuses on two important chants of our daily puja. They are Vandana (Homage) and Ti-sarana (Three Refuges). They are creatively written into fun and catchy tunes and songs. Chanting “The Three Refuges” as a daily practice helps us recall the good qualities of the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha. It inspires and motivates us to tread in the footsteps of our teacher, Buddha.

Read on to hear conversations between D-kidz Dhamma Class teacher and its students when they discuss about the purpose of Buddhist chant.

 

Gina: Teacher Sue Ann, why do Buddhists chant? It is kind of boring for us kids as we don’t understand what it mean.

Jesslyn: I know you can become a Buddha if you can chant well.

Children laugh….

Teacher Sue Ann: No my dear Gina and Jesslyn. Now let me ask you. Do you recite the national pledge everyday at school before lesson begins?

Children: Yes

Teacher Sue Ann: Can anyone tell me why?

Gina: To remind us of the qualities of a good citizen.

Jesslyn: But sometimes we recite it without giving it any thought. So its meaningless and boring.

Teacher Sue Ann: Exactly! So when we chant we must concentrate on the meaning to remind us on the good qualities of Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha. And that will inspire us and before you know it you will become wiser and stronger in your faith in Buddha.

Jesslyn: What does Namotassa mean?

Gina: Teacher Sue Ann, may I Jesslyn question?

Teacher Sue Ann: Yes, you may.

Gina: It means honor to Him.

Teacher Sue Ann:  Very good Gina. Buddha will be really proud of you

Jesslyn: But I am still not clear. Can you make it simpler for me?

Teacher Sue Ann: Ok, Jesslyn. The meaning of the opening verse is we pay our highest respect to Buddha, The Noble One, the Fully Enlighten One. Remember, he is the highest, wisest and the most loving one. He is also known to many as…

Gina and Jesslyn: The Teacher of Gods and Men.

Teacher Sue Ann: You’ve got it. Now can we move on to learn about taking refuge in the Triple Gem? Meaning Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha?

 

The above conversation is part of the D-kidz Chant. This album is created based on a fiction story of Gina and Jesslyn learns about Buddhist Chant (Triple Gem) from Teacher Sue Ann. Click here to learn more about D-kidz Chant album.

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Kammic Note:

Duplication of this CD by any individual or organization for personal or free distribution is a violation of the second Buddhist precept of “Taking what is not given” and also constitute an infringement of copyright law.